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"I want you to know that I'm not a critic or theorist, which means that in my work I look for solutions as problems arise." So begins the first of eight classes that the great Argentine writer Julio Cort�zar delivered at UC Berkeley in 1980. These "classes" are as much reflections on Cort�zar's own writing career as they are about literature and the historical moment in which he lived. Covering such topics as "the writer's path" ("while my aesthetic world view made me admire writers like Borges, I was able to open my eyes to the language of street slang, lunfardo...") and "the fantastic"("unbeknownst to me, the fantastic had become as acceptable, as possible and real, as the fact of eating soup at eight o'clock in the evening"), Literature Class provides the warm and personal experience of sitting in a room with the great author. As Joaquin Marco stated in El Cultural, "exploring this course is to dive into Cort�zar designing his own creations.... Essential for anyone reading or studying Cort�zar, cronopio or not!"

Roy Peter Clark, one of America's most influential writing teachers, draws writing lessons from 25 great texts. Where do writers learn their best moves? They use a technique that Roy Peter Clark calls X-ray reading, a form of reading that lets you penetrate beyond the surface of a text to see how meaning is actually being made. In THE ART OF X-RAY READING, Clark invites you to don your X-ray reading glasses and join him on a guided tour through some of the most exquisite and masterful literary works of all time, from The Great Gatsby to Lolita to The Bluest Eye, and many more. Along the way, he shows you how to mine these masterpieces for invaluable writing strategies that you can add to your aresenal and apply in your own writing. Once you've experienced X-ray reading, your writing will never be the same again.

A sweeping, kaleidoscopic, and passionate novel that presents a stunning series of flashes — scenes, moods, dreams, and weather— as the narrator wanders through Lima. Published in 1928 to great acclaim when its author was just twenty years old, The Cardboard House is sweeping, kaleidoscopic, and passionate. The novel presents a stunning series of flashes — scenes, moods, dreams, and weather— as the narrator wanders through Barranco (then an exclusive seaside resort outside Lima). In one beautiful, radical passage after another, he skips from reveries of first loves, South Pole explorations, and ocean tides, to precise and unashamed notations of class and of race: an Indian woman “with her hard,shiny, damp head of hair—a mud carving,” to a gringo gobbling “synthetic milk,canned meat, hard liquor.” Adán’s own aristocratic family was in financial freefall at the time, and, as the translator notes, The Cardboard House is as “subversive now as when it was written: Adán’s uncompromising poetic vision and the trueness and poetry of his voice constitute a heroic act against cultural colonialism.”

Provides practical coaching on writing long or short autobiographical narratives, including a history of autobiography and examples from such writers as Maya Angelou, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Russell Baker

Flash fiction is over in the blink of an eye yet lingers with the reader. In Brevity, David Galef guides creative writing students through this timely literary genre, detailing best techniques, key examples, and provocative prompts that will help aspiring writers pack the most punch in the fewest words. Flash fiction, or the “short-short,” which encompasses vignettes, prose poems, character sketches, fables, lists, twist stories, surrealism, metafiction, and other forms, has taken off over the past decade in both print and digital publications. Galef traces the genre back to such writers as Colette, Donald Barthelme, and Borges, demonstrating the compression and concision of character, plot, and dialogue that make the perfect miniature. Galef, a writer and longtime creative writing instructor, shows how developing one’s skills in the short-short form can translate to other forms of writing. His diverse selection of stories and engaging exercises and prompts make Brevity a valuable resource for creative writing students and others who want to try their hands at this increasingly popular form.

In The World Goes On, a narrator first speaks directly, then tells eleven unforgettable stories, and then bids farewell ("for here I would leave this earth and these stars, because I would take nothing with me"). As L�szl� Krasznahoraki himself explains: "Each text is about drawing our attention away from this world, speeding our body toward annihilation, and immersing ourselves in a current of thought or a narrative..." A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls, at the edge of the abyss in his own mind, wanders the chaotic streets of Shanghai. A traveler, reeling from the sights and sounds of Varanasi, encounters a giant of a man on the banks of the Ganges ranting on the nature of a single drop of water. A child laborer in a Portuguese marble quarry wanders off from work one day into a surreal realm utterly alien from his daily toils. The World Goes On is another amazing masterpiece by the winner of the 2015 Man Booker International Prize. "The excitement of his writing," Adam Thirwell proclaimed in the New York Review of Books, "is that he has come up with this own original forms--there is nothing else like it in contemporary literature."

"People used to tell me, if you keep on writing maybe you'll make a name for yourself," New York-based artist and writer Constance DeJong (born 1950) wrote in Modern Love. "They were right: My name's Constance DeJong. My name's Fifi Corday. My name's Lady Mirabelle, Monsieur Le Prince, and Roderigo. Roderigo's my favorite name. First I had my father's name, then my husband's, then another's. I don't know. I don't want to know the cause of anything." Modern Love, DeJong's first book, was published in 1977 by Standard Editions, an imprint co-founded by DeJong and Dorothea Tanning. In 1978, the text was adapted into a 60-minute radio program accompanied by the "Modern Love Waltz," a piano composition by Philip Glass. In this new edition, DeJong's debut novel is brought back into print, her dissonant shifts of voice and inimitable staccato rhythm made available to a new generation of readers.

In just over half a century, Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1742-1799) had the time to be all of the following: a hunchback; a mathematician; a physics professor; a connoisseur of hare pate; a hermit; an electrical theorist; a skirtchaser; a friend of King George III of England; an asthmatic; a defender of reason; a hypochondriac; a dying man; and the author of 8,000 fragments written with ink and goose quills. Traditionally those fragments have been considered no more than aphorisms, to be sipped like fine schnapps, but certain scholars claim, however, that his famous "Wastebooks" are really the scattered pieces of a Great Novel, and that this might yet be reconstructed, with the help of scissors, glue, and paper, and by using what is left of out imaginations. The present volume retracts, among other things, the work undertaken for more than a century by valiant Lichtenbergians.

'I loved writing Make Me, and Andy Martin's Reacher Said Nothing gives you the how, why, when and where - warts and all.' - Lee Child WARNING: CONTAINS SPOILERS On September 1, 1994, Lee Child went out to buy the paper to start writing his first novel, in pencil. The result was Killing Floor, which introduced his hero Jack Reacher. Twenty years later, on September 1, 2014, he began writing Make Me, the twentieth novel in his number-one- bestselling Reacher series. Same day, same writer, same hero. The difference, this time, was that he had someone looking over his shoulder. Andy Martin, uber Reacher fan, Cambridge academic, expert on existentialism, and dedicated surfer, sat behind Lee Child in his office and watched him as he wrote. While Lee was writing his Reacher book, Andy was writing about the making of Make Me. Reacher Said Nothing is a book about a guy writing a book. An instant meta-book. It crosses genres, by bringing a high-level critical approach to a popular text, and gives a fascinating insight into the art of writing a thriller, showing the process in real time. It may well be the first of its kind. [Spoiler alert: if you haven't read Make Me yet, this book contains spoilers]

"Selections from Cortâazar's 1984 collection Salvo el crepâusculo (see HLAS 50:3601), including prose commentaries from that volume. En face. Highly accomplished, colloquial translations. Short translator's preface; biographical note. Selection 'attemptsto represent the range of Cortâazar's poetic accomplishment' without traditional organization, following original volume's method. Excellent contribution to bibliography"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

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